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Think Long-Term

Although I expect gold prices to rise sharply by the end of the year, possibly even testing its all-time high near $1924 an ounce, I’m the first to admit that short-term forecasts are highly uncertain. I’m much more confident about the long-term prospects for gold. Indeed, looking out towards the end of the decade and beyond, I believe the metal’s price will rise to a multiple of the currently prevailing price. ...

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Gold: Short-Term Risk vs. Long-Term Opportunity

Autumn has been a cruel season for gold investors. In contrast to some anticipated seasonal bump up, the yellow metal’s price has been driven lower by bearish technical indicators and excessive negative sentiment among a small number of large-scale institutional speculators – bullion banks, hedge funds, program traders and the like – trading mostly in futures and over-the-counter “paper” markets for very short-term gains while remaining indifferent to the metal's long-term bullish fundamentals. Despite this dismal performance and continuing bearishness among many traders, gold should still ...

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GOLD: Balancing on a Knife Edge

It’s time to fess up:  Over the past week or two, I’ve been reluctant to say much about gold’s short-term price prospects.  Now, it seems to me that prices are set up for a big move . . . but in what direction?  That is the question. Gold markets can no longer count on rising geopolitical risk to gin up prices.  Lately, gold has largely ignored the myriad of risks that occupy the daily headlines.  Significant events attract some brief attention and a short-lived bump in safe-haven demand for a day or a week with briefly spurting higher before giving up any gains. If geopolitical events ...

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GOLD Explained: A Brief Note on Recent Market Action

Gold's failure to sustain its recent price gains, gains achieved over the past few weeks, triggered a wave of computer-generated technical selling on Monday morning that, in minutes, knocked gold prices back down to psychologically important technical support levels just above $1300 an ounce. I do not subscribe to any of the various conspiracy theories to explain gold's latest tumble, even though the recent news and gold-market fundamentals suggest the yellow metal should be moving higher. (For more on this bullish view, see "Gold: Now is the Time," NicholsOnGold, July 2, 2014.) The ...

Gold: On the Verge . . . or Nearing a Cliff

Gold has had difficulty sustaining recent rallies and remains trapped in a $50 trading range.  At the lower end, incremental physical demand has so far kept the price above its recent floor around $1175 an ounce . . . but selling by funds and other institutional traders of gold ETFs and “paper” proxies has limited attempts to rally. Whatever improvement in sentiment and upward momentum that may have resulted from this year’s encouraging first-quarter start has now dissipated.  The longer gold lingers in its current range the more difficult it will be for the yellow metal to break out on the ...

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Easy Money – The Elixir of Gold

So far, 2014 has been a year of recovery for gold.  Trading recently near $1,320 an ounce, the metal is already up some 10 percent from its 2013 year-end price of $1,201.50 in the London bullion market. Gold’s improvement was apparently quite a surprise to many of the most prominent analysts and investors who, forecasting the price through a rear-view mirror, expected prices to head further south.  With gold possibly on a sustainable upswing, they are now busy jacking up their gold-price targets. Although gold has recovered smartly in recent weeks, an uninterrupted upswing to ...

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A Quick Note on Inflation, Unemployment, and Fed Targeting

There was a time when price stability and well-behaved indicators of inflation would send gold prices lower.  After all, many investors and savers typically buy and hold gold as an inflation hedge.  With little inflation in sight, prospective buyers would not be expected to stock up on the yellow metal . . . and some might even wish to reduce their bullion holdings. Uncharacteristically, today’s (Tuesday's) news that U.S. producer prices were flat in July sent gold prices up more than $12 an ounce in New York trading. ...

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Macro-Economics and the Future Price of Gold

The future price of gold will likely reflect a wide variety of prospective developments.  That's what makes gold so interesting . . . and so difficult to predict. The intensity of private-sector demand in China, India, and elsewhere in Asia is high on my list of gold-price influencers. Similarly, the magnitude of net central-bank reserve acquisitions will almost certainly play an important role. So too could the unfolding economic and political situation in Europe. Alternatively, gold prices may wind up hinging most of all on some black swan or unpredictable event in the ...

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U.S. Election Results: Best of All Possible Worlds for Gold

Tuesday's election outcome - with President Obama returning to the White House, the Democrats retaining a weak majority in the Senate, but without enough seats to overcome a Republican veto on important legislation, and a strong Republican majority in the House of Representatives - may be the best of all possible world's for gold investors. Just a month ago, on October 5th, gold reached an 11-month high just over $1,795 an ounce.  Since then, in the run up to yesterday's election, the yellow metal slumped as low as $1,672 - reflecting the prospects that a Romney victory might bring a reversal ...

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GOLD: Still Waiting for the Fed

Gold shed more than $50 an ounce in a blink following last Wednesday’s news from the Federal Reserve that America’s central bank would not, at least not now, initiate another round of quantitative easing, opting instead for more muted monetary stimulus by extending its “Operation Twist” through year-end. Operation Twist, in which the Fed sells short-term U.S. Treasury securities from its portfolio and simultaneously purchases longer-dated Treasury notes and bonds, is intended to stimulate the economy by lowering medium- and long-term interest rates without actually speeding up growth in the ...

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