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My Recent Interview with Mine.com

I recently sat down with Mining.com to talk about gold and the outlook for the yellow metal.  Here's a summary of that conversation:   Jeffrey Nichols has been a precious metal economist for over 25 years, so if there’s someone who knows every nook and cranny of the gold market, that is him. Like many others, including American lawyer and author Jim Rickards and RBC Capital Markets, he has been predicting that the price of gold is going rise before January 1, 2017, especially taking into account that it has been up by 25% for the past six months. “This is far better than the major ...

Gold: Day of Reckoning Ahead

Although the price of gold is up some 25 percent so far this year, the metal still remains 30 percent below its all-time high of $1,924 registered in September 2011 – so there’s still plenty of room overhead for the price of gold to move higher – as I think it will – without excessive resistance. I’m no gold bug – but I have been “super bullish” on gold for the past few years. Now, I think the yellow metal’s day of reckoning is quickly approaching. A decisive break above $1,400 an ounce could be just around the corner – and, to my mind, would signal the start of gold’s next major ...

Cold War Redux — Good for Gold

For the past year and longer, financial-market expectations of U.S. Federal Reserve interest-rate policies have been the single-most important determinant of day-to-day fluctuations in the price of gold. Indeed, the persistent widespread belief that the Fed would soon start weaning the markets off near-zero interest rates, however wrong, has weighed heavily on gold prices while fueling bubble-like conditions in many other asset markets – most notably equities, long-term bonds, the U.S. dollar, New York apartment prices, collectibles of all sorts, etc. All the while, gold has virtually ...

Gold: Pregnant with Possibility

This year, 2015, could be the year for gold to shine. Having recorded its all-time high above $1920 an ounce in September 2011, the metal has been in decline now for nearly three and a half years and, consequently, its allure as a reliable hedge asset and store of value has been tarnished. But while gold as been scorned by many Westerners – principally American and European institutional investors and short-term speculators – it has remained in favor most everywhere else. Long-term investors and savers across much of Asia – especially China and India, by far the largest and most ...

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2015: A Very Good Year for Gold

After some three years of disappointment, 2015 promises to be a good year for gold investors. While the near-term price outlook remains uncertain, I feel fairly confident that gold will be considerably higher at this time next year – and on its way to new historic highs in the years ahead. A number of factors, some interrelated, will drive gold higher. ...

Gold: Any Day Now . . .

Any day now, gold could find itself in a sustainable long-term uptrend – or not. What remains true is that near-term gold-price prospects remain uncertain with the continuing possibility of sizeable price moves in either – or even both – directions. What also remains true is the high probability that the yellow metal’s price will be considerably higher at this time next year – with a sustainable long-term upswing already underway. ...

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Gold: Short-Term Risk vs. Long-Term Opportunity

Autumn has been a cruel season for gold investors. In contrast to some anticipated seasonal bump up, the yellow metal’s price has been driven lower by bearish technical indicators and excessive negative sentiment among a small number of large-scale institutional speculators – bullion banks, hedge funds, program traders and the like – trading mostly in futures and over-the-counter “paper” markets for very short-term gains while remaining indifferent to the metal's long-term bullish fundamentals. Despite this dismal performance and continuing bearishness among many traders, gold should still ...

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Back from Vacation: The More Things Change . . .

I’m just back from a two-week vacation from the gold market.  In the interim much has changed – especially the metal’s price, which has fallen some $65 to $75 an ounce.  That’s more than five percent – but no reason to despair! While the price has weakened, the metal’s fundamentals, fundamentals we have discussed in past reports, have continued to improve, so much so that some bounce-back now seems likely – with bigger gains due later this year. ...

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Gold: On the Verge . . . or Nearing a Cliff

Gold has had difficulty sustaining recent rallies and remains trapped in a $50 trading range.  At the lower end, incremental physical demand has so far kept the price above its recent floor around $1175 an ounce . . . but selling by funds and other institutional traders of gold ETFs and “paper” proxies has limited attempts to rally. Whatever improvement in sentiment and upward momentum that may have resulted from this year’s encouraging first-quarter start has now dissipated.  The longer gold lingers in its current range the more difficult it will be for the yellow metal to break out on the ...

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Gold Insights on Recent Price Action

The past few weeks have been trying times for gold investors.  In mid-March, just when it looked like gold prices were set to break out into higher territory, the market shifted into reverse, leaving many investors and analysts wondering what was going on. To put some numbers on it, at its recent low point, gold was off some eight percent from its mid-March six-month high – and is continues bouncing around within the technically significant $1265 to $1305 range.  A breakout in either direction could set the market’s tone for the weeks ahead. That said, we’ve never put much faith in ...

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